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Thread: So you want to get a sportbike?

  1. #21
    I'd read that before and while some of it is good advice I question a lot of what is in there. Particularly about how sport bikes actually work.

    You bump the throttle and get a huge burst of power? Really? Not how my ZX6 works at all. You have to be turning 12k RPM before this MIGHT be true.

    Supersports don't like to change lines? Really? I thought they where specifically designed to change directions quickly and easily? He sure he isn't talking about a Harley or a cruiser?

    As soon as I start seeing garbage like that I start to question what the person who wrote it actually knows about motorcycles and riding.

    I would never recommend a new rider start on a supersport bike but not based on the way the points are laid out there.

  2. #22
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    Like has been said earlier overall a good read with good intent but I don't agree with some of the partial info provided. While it is true that most successful racers didn't start on a 600+cc bike it also true most successful racers started riding a motorcycle before they were 6 years old so they physically couldn't start on a 600+cc bike even if they wanted to. Also Max Biaggi who is the only successful racer I know of that started after the age of 16 started on a 250ccgp bike but to say that bike was or is easier to ride or more forgiving that a production 600 is ridiculous. I won't argue against starting off on a 250 or 500 even though I started on a 600cc bike ,but I will argue that riding a 250 doesn't magically turn you into a racer either only thing that does that is a $h!t ton of time on the track(practice) and alot of luck(genetically gifted) .

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by ApogeeNow View Post
    Good read, but I disagree with his generalization stating that: "Going fast in a straight line takes no skill. . ."
    Nothing can be further from the truth.
    If you don't agree, try talking with the "Over 200 mph" riders, they'll explain it better than me,
    because not only does it take a lot of skill, it also takes a lot of balls.
    Ahem... Fixed.

    I definitely have to show this to my friends who have suddenly started looking around for motorcycles that are faster and more powerful than mine (for their first bike)...
    Inside joke quote from an old thread.

    Description of the bike I ride with all these mods.

    Troll .gif to mess with forum-goers.


  4. #24
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    I started on a ninja 250 back in December and based my decision on reading a shit load of articles like this online. The is a great bike to start on but I was just too tall to keep it. I sold it after only putting 1000 miles on it because it became way too uncomfortable. Now I have a zx6r and actually find it easier to ride than the 250... my problem when i started was shifting. I hated it, and on the 250 you have shift a lot. Turning was also hard for me but i believe that's because my knees were 2 inches from the handle bars lol. Everyday riding just seems a lot easier now that im on the zx6r.

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  5. #25
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    Great article.

    I put about 8k miles on my GS before it spontaneously combusted.

    Now, with the 636, I'm glad I did. After fighting with it on the highway at 85 with no windscreen, shifting 100 times a stop light just to keep up, and going on rides and keeping up with actual sport bikes, it really teaches you how to handle a bike, even if its fighting with you the whole way.

    I feel, for me, the GS was all about experience; that was what the past 8k miles were about. I probably encountered more pucker up moments on that than I will on the 636, because I was pushing it to the edge of its limits, and and with the new bike, there is no need.

    For anyone who read all that, please, get a slow, small bike for your first bike, learn the finer points about riding, like good throttle control, keeping speed in corners (not making up for it in the straights) and learn what having brakes that don't work great feels like.

    You'll be a more experienced rider than a new guy who jumps on a 600+ and can do 100 on I-75, but can't navigate a parking lot at 5mph without dragging his feet the whole time.

    Oh, and buy a fire extinguisher.

    2005 Suzuki GS500 - Waffle machine - Fire-RIP
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  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkyzZX6R View Post
    I started on a ninja 250 back in December and based my decision on reading a shit load of articles like this online. The is a great bike to start on but I was just too tall to keep it. I sold it after only putting 1000 miles on it because it became way too uncomfortable. Now I have a zx6r and actually find it easier to ride than the 250... my problem when i started was shifting. I hated it, and on the 250 you have shift a lot. Turning was also hard for me but i believe that's because my knees were 2 inches from the handle bars lol. Everyday riding just seems a lot easier now that im on the zx6r.

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2
    Curious to know if you think you could of gone straight to a 600? The 250 is great for some people, no doubt about it. But riding my g/f's 250 a few years back I found it heavy for what it was and unstable at over 65 mph and with a crosswind forget it. I understand it's more forgiving if you make a mistake but it def has it's downside.
    2014 Mustang GT
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  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stricken View Post
    Was this written by the Kawasaki Ninja 250 marketing dept? Maybe everyone should be forced to ride a moped first then graduate to a moped with a clutch then maybe a scooter then a scooter with a clutch then a 250. Then maybe you could have the skill to ride a 500cc bike?
    wait, your from the UK right or at least born there? (I could be wrong) They have about 5 motorcycle license that are covered by age and engine size. And years of riding experience to go up to the next engine size.

    And if you want to get anything above a 600 you have to be 24 or older or have 2 years riding experience.

    Just saying it makes alot more sense to let ego and false riding ability disappear then just getting a bigger bike.

    We all have something to say when we see some young kid in a fast car driving like a manic, wanting to race the motorcycle, or wrecking, its no different on two wheels.

    Even if the kid who wrecked on the other thread was an excellent rider, He didnt have the patience to wait for a real chance to overtake. I use to do alot of dumb stuff back home which is all single lane roads. Meaning if I overtake a car I have to go into opposite flow of traffic. Ive overtaken cars at the beginning of the block just to make the turn at the end of the block.

    Just plain dumb stuff, then I develop patience and less "I have to pass everything and everyone"
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  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stricken View Post
    Curious to know if you think you could of gone straight to a 600? The 250 is great for some people, no doubt about it. But riding my g/f's 250 a few years back I found it heavy for what it was and unstable at over 65 mph and with a crosswind forget it. I understand it's more forgiving if you make a mistake but it def has it's downside.
    I absolutely believe i could have went straight to a 600. it depends on the person. I'm a fairly quick learner. It was all abt throttle control for me. Staying calm in critical situations will prevent that right hand from giving it too much throttle...

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  9. #29
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    Yes I'm from the UK but my point was being stupid in a fast car, slow car, fast bike or slow bike can still get you killed. I don't like Gov't telling me what I am or am not ready to ride or drive, I think it's BS.
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  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by caniserre View Post
    Ahem... Fixed.

    I definitely have to show this to my friends who have suddenly started looking around for motorcycles that are faster and more powerful than mine (for their first bike)...
    So much for my proof reading skills. . . .

    Thanks!
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    ApogeeNow - you are more than a little scary man.
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    Tommy, you really scare me sometimes.
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  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stricken View Post
    Yes, I'm from the UK but my point was being stupid in a fast car, slow car, fast bike or slow bike can still get you killed.
    I don't like Gov't telling me what I am or am not ready to ride or drive, I think it's BS.
    That's it, in a nutshell.
    It isn't the machine, but the person operating the machine.
    Quote Originally Posted by PoppaNoDoz View Post
    ApogeeNow - you are more than a little scary man.
    Quote Originally Posted by The_Jarhead View Post
    Tommy, you really scare me sometimes.
    2007 Plasma Blue ZX-1464
    1464cc Bored & Stroked Motor, Re-Flashed ECU, OER Full Hi-Exhaust,
    SpeedoHealer, FP Velocity Stacks, Under-Cut Gears & No Flies!


    2005 Subaru Forester XT (AWD madness!)
    1997 34' Fleetwood Bounder (Chevy Big Block Power at its slowest!)

  12. #32
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    Yes! And it's not their job to fix stupid.
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  13. #33
    Starting riding, on a new supersport class 600cc inline 4, such as a cbr600, gsxr600,r6, or zx6r ... is just plain MORONIC... if you started on one of these bikes, and you are alive today, wonderful, great for you. But preaching it to others as a starter bike is irresponsible at best. Stating why is just me repeating what is in the original article...
    1991 Ninja zx600(sold) 1989 Ninja zx-10(sold) 2002 Ninja zx-7r(totalled) 2004 GSXR 750 (totalled) 1984 Honda VF700 F Interceptor(traded)
    1992 XJ600 Seca II(sold) 2005 CBR1000RR(traded) 2004 FJR 1300 ABS

  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by NatBrown View Post
    I'd read that before and while some of it is good advice I question a lot of what is in there. Particularly about how sport bikes actually work.

    You bump the throttle and get a huge burst of power? Really? Not how my ZX6 works at all. You have to be turning 12k RPM before this MIGHT be true.

    Supersports don't like to change lines? Really? I thought they where specifically designed to change directions quickly and easily? He sure he isn't talking about a Harley or a cruiser?

    As soon as I start seeing garbage like that I start to question what the person who wrote it actually knows about motorcycles and riding.

    I would never recommend a new rider start on a supersport bike but not based on the way the points are laid out there.
    Actually the sportbike is very hard to turn when compared to other bikes.
    This is caused by narrow handlebars, sitting position, somewhat steering damper, weight distribution being mostly on the front.
    "Beware of the lollipop of mediocrity. One lick and you'll suck forever!"Brian Willson

    “I guess it's because we all want to believe that what we do is very important, that people hang on to our every word, that they care what we think. The truth is, you should consider yourself lucky if you even occasionally get to make someone - anyone - feel a little better. After that, it's all about the people that you've let into your life.”— J.D.

  15. #35
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    Hard to turn is the old 3 wheeler ATV. You wanna talk about a SOB to turn THAT might be the hardest thing I have ever tried to turn especially at low speeds. You should be at least 18 to ride one if those lol.
    2014 Mustang GT
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  16. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by RICO View Post
    Actually the sportbike is very hard to turn when compared to other bikes.
    This is caused by narrow handlebars, sitting position, somewhat steering damper, weight distribution being mostly on the front.
    We will agree to disagree then. Short wheelbase, steep steering head angle, short trail all are done to make the sport bike unstable and quick/willing the change directions.

  17. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by NatBrown View Post
    We will agree to disagree then. Short wheelbase, steep steering head angle, short trail all are done to make the sport bike unstable and quick/willing the change directions.
    I guess it is from personal experience of many years of riding, also owning a cruiser, KLR, small sportbikes from 250s to 1100 and everything in between, going to the track, doing fast riding and slow cruises.

    Best example, take my KLR with the wide handlebars and my R1, go make a U turn in a neighborhood street.
    From the 3 bikes I have now. The easiest to turn, KLR. Then the Ninja 250, then the R1.

    Also, why do all the stunters, who make some very quick maneuvers, put wide handlebars on their bikes?
    Last edited by RICO; 04-30-2012 at 08:53 AM.
    "Beware of the lollipop of mediocrity. One lick and you'll suck forever!"Brian Willson

    “I guess it's because we all want to believe that what we do is very important, that people hang on to our every word, that they care what we think. The truth is, you should consider yourself lucky if you even occasionally get to make someone - anyone - feel a little better. After that, it's all about the people that you've let into your life.”— J.D.

  18. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stricken View Post
    Was this written by the Kawasaki Ninja 250 marketing dept? Maybe everyone should be forced to ride a moped first then graduate to a moped with a clutch then maybe a scooter then a scooter with a clutch then a 250. Then maybe you could have the skill to ride a 500cc bike?
    Yes.
    While I despise any additional regulations, the tiered system would keep some dumbasses alive. IMNSHO 17 year olds suffering from "I know everything disease" have no business on liter bikes.

    Jim
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  19. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronin View Post
    Yes.
    While I despise any additional regulations, the tiered system would keep some dumbasses alive. IMNSHO 17 year olds suffering from "I know everything disease" have no business on liter bikes.

    Jim
    You can look at that from both sides of the fence I suppose. It's what parents are for to
    keep their kids level headed and safe not the Gov't.
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  20. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stricken View Post
    You can look at that from both sides of the fence I suppose. It's what parents are for to
    keep their kids level headed and safe not the Gov't.
    yeah but then parents would actually have to be responsible for their children. and if you haven't been out in public lately, that has pretty much ceased.
    Brian
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    whatever... like youve never decapitated a goat and 2 chickens and left them on the beach accidentally.
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