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Gsxr 600 valve adjustment part 1 of 3
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  1. #1
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    Gsxr 600 valve adjustment part 1 of 3

    enjoy and remember, this is how i did my valve adjustment. this procedure is not warrantied, garanteed or even promised to work for u. ok? i want u to understand that when u work on ur bike, it's ur responsibility to do the job right. any eff ups is on u and not my fault. i'm just tryin help u out for free. i got (300) make that 14,000 miles on the bike since i did the valves and she runs strong. no issues.

    http://s596.photobucket.com/albums/t...%20Adjustment/

    Date of project: May 23, 2009
    14,400 miles
    2007 gsx r600
    VALVE ADJUSTMENT

    NOTE: for this write up, the clutch lever side is the left side and the throttle grip side is the right side of the bike.

    You don’t need to be a pro mechanic to perform the valve adjustment, just have basic tool knowledge and basic mechanical ability. There are a lot of steps to accomplish this but it is very easy. I took my time (cuz i’m slow and need vodka at the end of the day) and spent 3 days to do it.

    You’ll notice that i do things a little different than the manual. This is to make my life easy. For instance, the manual says to only prop up the gas tank,--it must be removed. You’ll be glad u did. Also this is the first time i did this on my gixxer so i learned a couple of things and you will benefit from my mistakes. You’ll notice when ur lookin at the pics and say, wait what? He still got the radiator fan motor on, hehe.

    Day 1 - tear down.
    Day 2 - valve clearance check and adjustment.
    Day 3 - put it all back together.

    If u can, get the manual. It’s a nice tool to have.

    You’ll need to buy the stuff to do the job and most important, have a plan as to where u gonna get the shims u will need. I’m lucky, i know a dude that has them.

    I bought valve cover gasket, pair valve gaskets, spark plugs, air filter, manual cam chain tensioner with gasket. $204.51

    Let’s begin

    1- remove seat. I like to return bolts back to their hole (when possible) once an item is removed. Helps me to not lose bolts.

    2- remove the 2 small plastics that are held in by the seat bolts. Gently pull them outward to disengage the velcro at the rear of the plastic and then slide them rearward.

    3- remove the gas tank. (pics 1-2-3) Prop it up and slide off the 2 vent hoses and disconnect the electrical connector. Disconnect the fuel line at the gas tank side. The fuel line is a quick disconnect, squeeze the green part and slide off. Only a small amount of fuel will leak out.(pics 4-5)

    4- remove the allen head bolt at the rear of the tank, the tank lifts up and off. I wrapped a rag and grocery bag around the end of the fuel line to help protect it from contaminants and so gas aint drippin.

    5- remove the plastic (undercover?) The plastic directly below the headlight, 2 phillips head screws and 4 nylon rivets. Remove >both< side plastics.

    6- remove the air box. I took the top off first then removed the lower part of it. Remove the pcv hose (pic 6). Remove the 3 electric plugs (pics 7-8) the 2 outside slide up and off, the one in the middle disconnects. Remove the 11 screws (pics 9-9a-9b). Lift the top off (pic 10).

    (pics 11-12) yes that’s a stock suzuki paper air filter. My third one. I decided to try a BMC filter and so far i like it. (pics 13-14) for those who use the K&N air filter u will need to remove this gasket. Leave in for the BMC

    7- The lower part is held on by a 10 mm bolt and 4 clamps underneath (pics 15-16 sorry blurry). They are just like hose clamp and it takes a phillips head screwdriver to loosen them. They’re tough to get at. TIP: remove the fuel injector electrical connector in front of the clamp ur loosening for extra work space. (pic 18). When the clamp is loose enuf, reconnect the fuel injector electrical connector. Then disconnect the pair valve hose on the right side (pic 17). the lower part now lifts off.

    Now u see wires everywhere. The good news is that for each component the electrical connector is unique, so no worry of connecting different things together. However, the spark plug coil connectors >are the same< and could possibly be cross wired (not good) BUT, on my bike the wire harness is so stiff that the plug wires line up automatic making it nearly impossible to cross wire the spark plugs. You’ll understand when u have it in ur hand.

    Now take a moment and look things over. You do not need to disconnect every electrical plug, only the ones to give u room to remove the valve cover.

    8- Next we disconnect the electrical connector for the PAIR control solenoid valve. Let’s call it the PCSV (pics 19-20). slip the 2 hoses off the valve cover, then slide the PCSV to the right off of its mounting bracket (pic 21).

    9- Disconnect the cam position sensor (CMP) electrical connector (pic 22) and the other electrical connectors that are obviously in the way. 4 plugs if i can count. (pics 23-24). Note: the valve cover is going to lift up and then slide forward and down for removal. Look closely at (pic 24), the white plug goes to the black plug. This one was difficult and did not want to separate. I ended up using a flat tip screw driver to squeeze and pry it apart.

    10- by hand, disconnect the electrical connectors from the spark plug coils. (Pic 23) shows 2 spark plug coils with their electrical connectors removed. The coils have a blue/white sticker on top. By hand, gently twist and pull the spark plug coils up and out. Do not bang or drop the coils. (Pic 24) is after the coils have been removed. Place these in order on a table so that when u reinstall they go back to the same place. Remove the spark plugs. I use the spark plug wrench that is in the tool kit that comes with the bike.

    11- time to move the throttle body out of the way. Find the throttle cables on the left side of the bike (pic 25). Note the position of the throttle cable adjusting nuts and screws. Then loosen the lock nuts and turn the adjusting screws to give slack to the cables. Lift the cables off their guide and pull the lead bead at the cable end out of its holder. Open the throttle by hand or with a screw driver to ease this process.

    12- on the right side (pic 26) pull back the rubber boot and disconnect the electrical connector. Then remove the other electric plug (pic 27) by sliding it off of its mounting bracket. Now loosen the 4 clamps at the base of the throttle body. They r just like the one for the air box in step 7 but not as hard to get at. Pull the throttle body up and move it towards the rear (pics 28-29).

    13- (pic 30) squeeze and push down to release the wire harness from this mount. It’s located on the right side of the bike and can also be seen in the lower left corner of (pic 28).
    Last edited by pop; 05-06-2012 at 07:48 PM.
    Originally Posted by Prettyboy
    yeah but your closer to a pop-tart -vs- a pop-a-dent.
    2003 Honda crf450r
    2006 Suzuki drz125

  2. #2
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    14- now we move the radiator forward. Remove the right side mounting bolt (pics 31-31a) (2 pics of the same bolt from diff angles) the left side mounting bolt (pic 32-32a). be careful not to lose the bolt sleeve. Loosen the lower mounting bolt (pic 33) and remove the lower bracket bolt (pic 33a). the radiator will now move forward.

    15- disconnect the radiator fan electrical plug and remove the radiator fan (pics 34-34a)

    16- disconnect the horn electrical plug (pic 35). then, on the left side, remove the 2 mounting bolts and remove the rectifier / horn (pics 35a-35b)

    17- now remove the plastic engine shield (pics 36-36a-36b). in the pics i am holding it by the top. It is held in place by the 2 pins at the bottom of it so it basically slips right out. (Pic 36b) i am pointing to the slot on the engine where the pin goes. (Pic 37) is taken from the right side. (Pic 38) is taken from the left side.

    18- now go back up top to remove the PCSV bracket (pics 39-39a) remove the wire harness, then remove the 10 mm mounting bolt. Next remove the cam position sensor (pic 22).

    19- remove the 6 bolts that hold down the valve cover (pics 40-40a). i had to use a screw driver to carefully pry the valve cover up. I started at a corner and lightly prying just barely moved it. Then moved my screw driver to another position to do the same thing and then again. Then i was able to get my fingers underneath the edge enuf so that i could lift the valve cover up. When hi enuf up, i move it forward while rotating the leading edge down so that it comes out beside the radiator.

    >>>Your engine is open. Go slow, be careful not to drop anything into your engine<<<

    20- draw this diagram (pic 40b) (i know i numbered the cylinders backwards, it don’t matter for our purposes). Front = front of bike, in = intake cam, ex = exhaust cam, the circles represent the tappets and in these circles is where you will record your clearances. You can see my feeler gauge. (Pic 40c) shows my clearances (i just took this pic). as you can see 15 of the valves are within spec with only one needing to be re-shimmed.

    The goal is to find the thickest feeler gauge that will fit between the tappet and the cam lobe. (Pic 45) the red arrow, an example of where to insert the feeler gauge. The shiny metal is the cam lobe. The disk directly below the cam lobe is the tappet. These are extremely small clearances. A set of feeler gauges that measures as small as 0.02 mm would be excellent.

    These are the tolerances:
    INTAKE CAM= 0.08 to 0.18 mm
    EXHAUST CAM= 0.18 to 0.28 mm

    I am not a professional so my approach is this....if i can insert the feeler gauge between the cam lobe and tappet with some amount of force, then its a good measurement. At 14,000 miles my valve springs are not worn out to the point where i could depress the valve with a feeler gauge.

    (I know this because when i attempted to use a gauge too thick, with all my strength i could not fit the gauge between the tappet and cam lobe).

    21- before we can check the clearances, we must align the cams. Look at (pic 41). Ignore the red zip tie for now. The lower left corner of the pic shows the access hole on the right side of the bike after the cover has been removed. This exposes the crank bolt (pic 42) which u turn clockwise only, this will rotate ur engine. The gear has a thin stripe on it, line it up with the small rib inside the casing like the pic.

    22- see (pic 43). On the left side of the bike, check that the position of the 2 cams and the notches ‘A’ are in the position shown. Also see (pic 44 sorry blurry). If they are not, go back to the access hole and rotate the crank bolt 360 degrees (one full turn) bringing the stripe in line with the rib again.

    23- now that the cams r in the correct position, check the clearances at points ‘B’ in (pic 43). Note: for each letter ‘B’ u take 2 measurements. Now u have recorded the clearances for 8 valves.

    24- again rotate the crank bolt 360 degrees to bring the stripe on the sprocket in line with the rib and to bring the cams to the position shown in (pic 47). The cam lobes point away from each other and note where notches ‘A’ are. Now check the clearances marked ‘C’. If all of your clearances are within tolerance, ur done. If ur changing out the cam chain tensioner, scroll down to find those steps. Then put the bike back together in reverse order.

    If u have valves that need to be re-shimmed, the cams will need to be removed and u need to set the cams in a certain position before u remove them.

    25- first lets remove the PAIR valves. Just pull them out. See (pic 41), the green arrows point to the 2 pair valves. (Pics 48-48a) show the gasket removed from the PAIR valve. The red arrow in (pic 48) points to the alignment notch. This notch ensures proper installation on the engine. In (pic 48a) the blue arrow points to part of the gasket that fits around the body of the PAIR valve. The green arrows point to the tabs that fit over the top of the PAIR valve and the red arrow points to the strip that fits under the PAIR valve.

    26- now we position the cams. Once the cams are in position DO NOT disturb the crank bolt until cams, chain and tensioner are reinstalled and fully secured. On the right side, on the face of the cam sprockets are numbers 1 2 3. By turning the crank bolt, line these numbers up like (pic 49). the number 1 will be aligned with the gasket surface of the cylinder head. 2 and 3 straight up.

    27- remove the cam chain tensioner. It is mounted on the right rear side of the engine. See (pic 50). (pic 50a) shows the cap bolt, spring, oil guide and tensioner. Remove the cap bolt and spring, then remove the mounting bolts and lift the tensioner out. The arrow in the pic points to a release pin that u push on to let the tension rod move in and out. Throw away the old gasket. The gasket surfaces must be completely free of old gasket. Pick off as much by hand, then be careful when ur scraping old gasket off of the engine not to let any drop in the tensioner hole. Stuff a rag in there. (Pic 50b) is the manual cam chain tensioner i put in.

    Strategy: remove one cam, change out the shims, put that cam back in the proper position, then remove the other cam, change out the shims, put that cam back.

    The shims r located underneath the tappet.

    There r too many scenarios to cover. You may need to pull one cam or both or neither. Neither u ask? If u need to only re-shim a valve at the far left, just lift the cam up a little and ur tappet will come out without having to fully remove the cam. See (pic 52b).

    Lets say we only need to remove the intake cam. Use a zip tie to secure the cam chain to the sprocket on the exhaust cam (pic 41)
    Originally Posted by Prettyboy
    yeah but your closer to a pop-tart -vs- a pop-a-dent.
    2003 Honda crf450r
    2006 Suzuki drz125

  3. #3
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    28- look at (pics 45-46) these r the cam journal holders. I will call them CJH. Where u took out the PAIR valve u can see the letter ‘A’ on the left and ‘B’ on the right. The arrows point to the front. These markings help u reinstall properly. Also notice the small numbers 1 to 26. These numbers r your loosening and tightening sequence. To loosen start at 26 and count backwards to 1 loosening each bolt a little at a time. the cams r under pressure from the valve springs and will raise up as you loosen so they must be loosened up evenly. 20 bolts total, it takes some time.

    29- see (pic 51) the cardboard kept track of my bolts. U want the bolts to go back to their original location. Notice the copper washers in (pic 46) on my bike i could not remove them from the journal except one. Remove any loose ones.

    30- with all the bolts removed the CJH pull up and off. Pull them off slowly, underneath each CJH there are 2 o-rings that may come off. See (pic 54) the number 3 points to them. If they do just put em back on. Also, see (pics 53-53a) there r 4 dowels. Keep track of them and where they go.

    31- lift up on the cam chain and lift the cam out. When we lift the cam out, we want to put something in place of the sprocket to keep the cam chain from slacking too much. A small plastic bottle maybe.

    32- placing a magnet in the center of the tappet, slide the tappet up, turn it over, there’s the shim (pics 55-55a). mic the thickness of the shim even if the numbers are readable.

    33- use the charts in (pics 56-57) to select the size of the replacement shim. Mic the new shim also to be sure. Put a little oil on the new shim and place it in the tappet so that the numbers are not visible. Press it in firmly.

    34- install the tappet.

    35- install the cam. Check the position numbers on the cam sprocket (pic 49) and starting at the arrow marked ‘2’ on the exhaust cam sprocket, engage the 12th pin on the cam chain with the arrow marked ‘3’ on the intake cam sprocket just like in the pic. Secure the chain to the sprocket with a zip tie.

    36- Install the CJH. Tighten the bolts following the numbered sequence little by little with a ratchet starting with 1. then torque to 7 ft lbs. I tightened each bolt to five ft lbs first, and then to 7 ft lbs.

    37- next we install the cam chain tensioner. lightly coat the surface of the gasket with ultra black (pic 58) so that it will stick to the tensioner. This gasket installs one way only.

    From here on i lightly coat the threads of all the bolts and screws with heavy black bearing grease. There are better greases out there but this is what i have. You do what ur comfortable with be it grease, locktite, nothing, its ur bike. I will say that i am not a fan of locktite.

    The tensioner mounting bolts torque to 7 ft lbs. By hand, turn in the adjuster bolt until u know u got pressure on the cam chain.

    38- remove both zip ties from cam sprockets. Rotate the crank bolt several revolutions. Things may click into place as you do this. Go back to the tensioner bolt and back it out then turn it in until u feel increased pressure, then back it off a half turn. Tighten the lock nut.

    39- Go back to step 21 to bring the cams to proper position to recheck the clearance where u re-shimmed.

    40- install the PAIR valves.

    41- install the access cover for the crank bolt. Torque to 8 ft lbs.

    42- fit the new gasket to the valve cover. Apply ultra black to the half circles and the strip between. Use a flat tip screw driver (pics 59-60) to spread it.

    43- install the valve cover. Torque the bolts to 10 ft lbs in a criss cross fashion.

    See (pic 58) squirt a small amount of dielectric grease into one end of all of the electrical plugs. From here on i will simply list the items that must be installed. Connect the electrical plugs as you go.

    · Check gap (7-8 mm) then install spark plugs. Torque to 8 ft lbs
    · Cam position sensor
    · PSCV bracket. Grease the prongs where the PSCV mounts, it helps it slide on and snap the wire harness in place.
    · engine shield.
    · rectifier / horn
    · radiator fan
    · radiator. Do the lower bracket first, then the 2 upper mounting bolts.
    · main wire harness (pic 30)
    · throttle body
    · throttle cables. On each cable there r 2 nuts on the adjusting screw. One nut goes tight against the adjusting screw, then inserts on one side of the mounting bracket. The other nut is the lock nut which goes on the other side of the mounting bracket. Tighten it. Then if necessary, adjust throttle play at the throttle grip.
    · spark plug coils
    · all electrical connectors
    · PSCV
    · air box lower part
    · new air filter
    · air box upper part
    · gas tank
    · body plastics
    · seat

    Congratulations!
    Originally Posted by Prettyboy
    yeah but your closer to a pop-tart -vs- a pop-a-dent.
    2003 Honda crf450r
    2006 Suzuki drz125

  4. #4
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    validation!

    some guy on gixxer.com did his valve adjustment an used my write up an said great job
    Originally Posted by Prettyboy
    yeah but your closer to a pop-tart -vs- a pop-a-dent.
    2003 Honda crf450r
    2006 Suzuki drz125

  5. #5
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    Now the real question and oh by the way thorough write up, and good job.
    Using the Suzuki manufacture specs where do you set the valves up at, on the tighter side of the scale or the loose side of the scale, that my friend is the real question.
    "YOU ARE THE ONLY LIMIT THATS CONTROLLING YOUR BIKE"

    "YOU CAN'T BOLT ON SKILL"

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by moke View Post
    Now the real question and oh by the way thorough write up, and good job.
    Using the Suzuki manufacture specs where do you set the valves up at, on the tighter side of the scale or the loose side of the scale, that my friend is the real question.
    i aim for the middle, but since the clearances tend to decrease over time if i can't hit middle i lean to increase gap.
    Originally Posted by Prettyboy
    yeah but your closer to a pop-tart -vs- a pop-a-dent.
    2003 Honda crf450r
    2006 Suzuki drz125

  7. #7
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    Keeping the clearances to the loosest side usually gains a bit more hp. You should always try to set them all the way on the loose side. By doing this you'll also create a much stronger and better charge of the mixture into the cylinder. Alot of people sometimes think that the tightest side of the mfr spec gives you more power which is totally false. This was taught to me at M.M.I in Phoenix, AZ. Later after working on a dyno and being taught by my shop foreman I realized the school was completely wrong. Loose makes more power!
    Last edited by moke; 07-05-2009 at 10:51 PM.
    "YOU ARE THE ONLY LIMIT THATS CONTROLLING YOUR BIKE"

    "YOU CAN'T BOLT ON SKILL"

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